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VLF modal interference distance and nighttime D region VLF reflection height for west - east and east - west propagation paths to Fiji

Chand, Atishnal E. and Kumar, Sushil (2017) VLF modal interference distance and nighttime D region VLF reflection height for west - east and east - west propagation paths to Fiji. Radio Science, 52 (8). pp. 1004-1015. ISSN 0048-6604

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    Abstract

    Very low frequency (VLF) signals from navigational transmitters propagate through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide formed by the Earth and the lower conducting ionosphere and show the pronounced minima during solar terminator transition between transmitter and receiver. Pronounced amplitude minima observed on 19.8 kHz (NWC transmitter) and 24.8 kHz (NLK transmitter) signals recorded at Suva (18.149°S, 178.446°E), Fiji, during 2013–2014, have been used to estimate the VLF modal interference distance (DMS) and nighttime D region VLF reflection height (hN). The NWC transmitter signal propagates mostly in west-east direction, and the NLK transmitter follows a transequatorial path propagating significantly in the east-west direction. The values of DMS calculated using midpath terminator speed are 2103 ± 172 km and 2507 ± 373 km for these paths having west-east and east-west components of VLF subionospheric propagation, respectively, which agree with previously published results and within 10% with theoretical values. We have also compared the DMS estimated using a terminator time method with that calculated using terminator speed for a particular day and found both the values to be consistent. The hN values were found to be maximum during winter of Southern Hemisphere for NWC signal and winter of Northern Hemisphere for NLK signal VLF propagation paths to Suva. The hN also shows significant day-to-day and seasonal variabilities with a maximum of about 10 km and 23 km for NWC and NLK signal propagation paths, respectively, which could be due to the atmospheric gravity waves associated with solar terminator transition, as well as meteorological factors such as strong lightnings.

    Item Type: Journal Article
    Subjects: Q Science > QC Physics
    Divisions: Faculty of Science, Technology and Environment (FSTE) > School of Engineering and Physics
    Depositing User: Ms Shalni Sanjana
    Date Deposited: 05 Jan 2018 12:36
    Last Modified: 05 Jan 2018 12:36
    URI: http://repository.usp.ac.fj/id/eprint/10435
    UNSPECIFIED

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