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Urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture, and annual patterns of urinary corticosterone in wild and captive endangered Fijian ground frogs (Platymantis vitiana)

Narayan, Edward J. and Molinia, F.C. and Christi, Ketan S. and Morley, Craig and Cockrem, J.F. (2010) Urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture, and annual patterns of urinary corticosterone in wild and captive endangered Fijian ground frogs (Platymantis vitiana). Australian Journal of Zoology, 58 (3). pp. 189-197. ISSN 0004-959X

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Abstract

This study was based on the development of a non-invasive glucocorticoid enzyme-immunoassay for the assessment of stress in wild and captive endangered Fijian ground frogs (Platymantis vitiana). Enzyme-immunoassays were developed and validated for the first time to non-invasively measure both cortisol and corticosterone metabolites in frog urine. Frog urine showed parallel displacement with corticosterone but not cortisol standards, therefore corticosterone enzyme immunoassays were used to examine stress in wild and captive frogs. Urinary corticosterone metabolite concentrations increased in frog urine (n = 4) at 6 h, 1 day and 2 days after injection with adrenocorticotropic hormone (0.44 μg g–1 bodyweight), indicating that the corticosterone enzyme-immunoassay could detect changes in circulating corticosterone in frogs. Urinary concentrations of corticosterone were measured in wild frogs (n = 18) after capture in the field. The first measurement beyond the initial sample was at 2–3 h. Mean urinary corticosterone concentrations rose after the initial sample and were significantly elevated in samples collected 3–4 h after capture. This is the first demonstration of a urinary corticosterone response to capture in amphibians. Urinary corticosterone metabolite concentrations for all months combined were lower in captive males than in wild males, and differed between vitellogenic, non-vitellogenic and captive females. Concentrations did not differ between captive and wild females. In conclusion, urinary corticosterone enzyme immunoassays can be used in frogs for assessing stress responses to capture and natural stress profiles of both captive and wild populations.

Item Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Q Science > QL Zoology
Divisions: Faculty of Science, Technology and Environment (FSTE) > School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
Depositing User: Ms Mereoni Camailakeba
Date Deposited: 29 Nov 2010 15:19
Last Modified: 16 Jul 2012 16:10
URI: http://repository.usp.ac.fj/id/eprint/1898
UNSPECIFIED

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