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High pressure analysis of the multiple melting endotherms of poly(ethylene succinate) and poly(butylene succinate)

Rohindra, David and Kuboyama, K. and Ougizawa, T. (2010) High pressure analysis of the multiple melting endotherms of poly(ethylene succinate) and poly(butylene succinate). Journal of Macromolecular Science - Part B: Physics, 49 (3). pp. 470-478. ISSN 0022-2348

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Abstract

The origin of the multiple melting peaks in two linear polyesters, poly(ethylene succinate) (PES) and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS), of isothermally crystallized samples was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at atmospheric pressure and high-pressure differential thermal analysis (HP-DTA) at elevated pressures. In PES, the DSC melting curves showed three endothermic peaks at slow heating rates, which decreased to two with increasing heating rates. The HP-DTA curves showed that the area (qualitative) and peak height of the high-temperature peak decreased with increasing pressure and merged with the low-temperature peak at pressures above 450 MPa. This behavior supported the melting, recrystallization, and remelting model for the observed multiple melting endotherms. In PBS, the DSC melting curves were similar to those seen in PES. The HP-DTA curves were also similar to PES up to 400 MPa, but above this pressure the area and the peak height of the high-temperature peak and the temperature difference between the high- and low-temperature peaks remained unchanged. This observation suggested that the two peaks in PBS were due to the melting of two populations of crystals with different lamellar thickness originally present in the sample. The multiple melting behavior in isothermally crystallized PBS is proposed to incorporate both the melting of two populations of crystals and melting, recrystallization, and remelting.

Item Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Q Science > QD Chemistry
Divisions: Faculty of Science, Technology and Environment (FSTE) > School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
Depositing User: Ms Mereoni Camailakeba
Date Deposited: 26 May 2010 12:53
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2012 15:11
URI: http://repository.usp.ac.fj/id/eprint/1916
UNSPECIFIED

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