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The behavioral ecology of shellfish gathering in Western Kiribati, Micronesia. 2: patch choice, patch sampling, and risk

Thomas, Frank R. (2007) The behavioral ecology of shellfish gathering in Western Kiribati, Micronesia. 2: patch choice, patch sampling, and risk. Human Ecology, 35 (5). pp. 515-526. ISSN 0300-7839

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Abstract

The prey choice model, previously applied among shellfish gatherers in Kiribati, Micronesia, has shown that they are foraging in a manner that matches the predictions of optimal foraging theory by maximizing their net energy return rates. Similar conclusions can be drawn subsequent to testing the patch choice model, including patch switching; patch sampling; and the analysis of risk. In light of these results, it is argued that natural selection probably never encouraged the persistence of conservation because individuals have nearly always benefited from short-term goals to ensure greater fitness. However, the possibility remains that as a result of changed circumstances brought about by increasing human population, more efficient extractive technologies, and expanding market opportunities, genuine, as opposed to epiphenomenal conservation, may become established in heavily impacted environments.

Item Type: Journal Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GF Human ecology. Anthropogeography
Divisions: Faculty of Arts, Law and Education (FALE) > Oceania Centre for Arts, Culture and Pacific Studies
Depositing User: Ms Mereoni Camailakeba
Date Deposited: 13 Jan 2007 10:38
Last Modified: 05 Jul 2012 19:41
URI: http://repository.usp.ac.fj/id/eprint/24
UNSPECIFIED

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