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The earliest-known humans in Fiji and their pottery: the first dates from the 2002 excavations at Naitabale (Naturuku), Moturiki Island

Kumar, Roselyn R.D. and Nunn, Patrick D. and Katayama, K. and Oda, H. and Matararaba, S. and Osborne, Tamara (2004) The earliest-known humans in Fiji and their pottery: the first dates from the 2002 excavations at Naitabale (Naturuku), Moturiki Island. The South Pacific Journal of Natural Sciences, 22 (1). pp. 16-22. ISSN 1013-9877

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    Abstract

    Until this study, the earliest-known people to have occupied the islands of Fiji were those who inhabited Matanamuani on Naigani Island as much as 1000 BC. Excavations at the Naitabale (Naturuku) site in southern Moturiki Island in June-July 2002 found an older settlement. From the nature of the pottery recovered from Naitabale, it appears to predate the Matanamuani site. Radiocarbon dates on charcoal from within the pits excavated at Naitabale confirm the site’s age. The dates show that the site could have been occupied as much as 1220 BC. A human burial (named “Mana”) found within the older layers of Pit T1 at Naitabale is that of a female, about 1.60 m tall, of slender build. The first radiocarbon date shows that she lived at least 650 BC, probably close to 950 BC. Further tests will determine her other characteristics.

    Item Type: Journal Article
    Subjects: C Auxiliary Sciences of History > CC Archaeology
    G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GF Human ecology. Anthropogeography
    Divisions: Office of the PVC (R&I)
    Depositing User: Ms Neha Harakh
    Date Deposited: 02 May 2004 13:38
    Last Modified: 23 Jul 2012 13:47
    URI: http://repository.usp.ac.fj/id/eprint/3103
    UNSPECIFIED

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