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Sustaining culture and biodiversity in Pacific Islands with local and indigenous knowledge

Thaman, Randolph R. (2004) Sustaining culture and biodiversity in Pacific Islands with local and indigenous knowledge. Pacific Ecologist, 7&8 . 43-48. ISSN 1175-6543

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Abstract

In the Pacific Islands, biodiversity is usually controlled and best understood by local communities as owners and users of the resource. This understanding forms a major component of local and indigenous knowledge systems (LINKS) - systems of “understanding, interpretation and meaning that are imbedded in the communities and provide the basis for local-level decision-making about fundamental aspects of day-to-day life.” The application of local and indigenous knowledge to the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity is crucial for the economic, cultural and ecological survival of almost all Pacific Island societies and nations. “Local” is included with “indigenous” because there are some resident local communities (e.g., Indian cane farmers and fishermen in Fiji) who are not indigenous, but have in-depth knowledge of their local biodiversity.

Item Type: Journal Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculty of Science, Technology and Environment (FSTE) > School of Geography, Earth Science and Environment
Depositing User: Ms Neha Harakh
Date Deposited: 09 May 2004 15:58
Last Modified: 09 May 2012 16:07
URI: http://repository.usp.ac.fj/id/eprint/3127
UNSPECIFIED

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