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Evaluation of physically small p-phenylacetate-modified carbon electrodes against fouling during dopamine detection in vivo

Chandra, Shaneel and Miller, A.D. and Wong, D.K.Y. (2013) Evaluation of physically small p-phenylacetate-modified carbon electrodes against fouling during dopamine detection in vivo. Electrochimica Acta, 101 . pp. 225-231. ISSN 0013-4686

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    Abstract

    In this paper, the effectiveness of anionic p-phenylacetate film was evaluated in protecting physically small conical-tip carbon electrodes (∼2�m radius and ∼4�m axial length)from fouling during dopamine detection in vivo. After characterising p-phenylacetate film-modified carbon electrodes in several redox systems in vitro, they were found to exhibit an 11% loss in dopamine oxidation signal over a 40-day storage period in ambient laboratory conditions, compared to over a 90% loss at bare carbon electrodes. In addition, by incubating in a synthetic laboratory solution containing the fouling reagents, 1.0% (v/v)caproic acid (a lipid), 0.1%(w/v) bovine serum albumin and 0.01%(w/v) cytochrome C (both are protein)and 0.002% (w/v) human fibrinopeptide B (a peptide), film-modified carbon electrodes showed a 29% reduction in the limit of detection and a 25%decrease in sensitivity for dopamine over 7 days, compared to undeterminable results arising from a severely degraded surface at bare carbon electrodes. During dopamine detection invivo,70- 95% of the dopamine oxidation current remained after the first 40min of the experiment, and at least 50% over the next 20min. In contrast, constant degradation in the dopamine oxidation signal was observed at bare carbon electrodes throughout the experiment. An average electrode surface fouling rate of 0.54%min−1 was estimated at the p-phenylacetate film-modified carbon electrodes during the first 40min of the experiments.

    Item Type: Journal Article
    Subjects: Q Science > QD Chemistry
    Q Science > QP Physiology
    Divisions: Faculty of Science, Technology and Environment (FSTE) > School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
    Depositing User: Shaneel Chandra
    Date Deposited: 19 Jul 2013 14:25
    Last Modified: 14 Jun 2016 15:15
    URI: http://repository.usp.ac.fj/id/eprint/5997
    UNSPECIFIED

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