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Learning from indigenous science: I - Kiribati knowledge, awareness, and adaptation to environmental change

Johnson, J.T. and O'Brien, L. and Rankey, E.C. and Uriam , T. and Uriam, Kambati K. and Feddema, J. (2013) Learning from indigenous science: I - Kiribati knowledge, awareness, and adaptation to environmental change. UNSPECIFIED. (Unpublished)

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    Abstract

    The Republic of Kiribati, a small island nation in the equatorial Pacific, is widely considered to be one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change and the effects of El-Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). This interdisciplinary team employed a mixed-methods approach including ethnographic interviews, historical documentation, monitoring of coastal dynamics, and climate modeling to examine environmental change on two of the nation's atolls, the densely populated capital, Tarawa, and a sparsely populated outer island, Aranuka. Semi-structured interviews with government officials and members of local communities provided insight into how the inhabitants use Indigenous ecological knowledge to understand, respond, and adapt to environmental change on the islands, including severe drought, coastal erosion, decreased quality of fresh water, and diminished coconut harvests. Although several strategies for short and long term environmental adaptation have been implemented, our research showed that long-term strategies are focused primarily on preparing the younger generation for future migration as I-Kiribati youth are increasingly encouraged to pursue opportunities for education, training, and employment overseas. Results from this study clearly illustrate the benefit of a mixed-methods approach that engages Indigenous ecological knowledge, not only for climate change research, but also in the development of adaptation strategies for ecologically vulnerable areas of the Pacific.

    Item Type: Other
    Additional Information: The study, as presented in the paper, clearly illustrate the benefit of a mixed-methods approach that engages Indigenous ecological knowledge, not only for climate change research, but also in the development of adaptation strategies for ecologically vulnerable areas of the Pacific.
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Indigenous peoples, climate change adaptation, Indigenous ecological knowledge
    Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > G Geography (General)
    G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GB Physical geography
    G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
    Divisions: Faculty of Arts, Law and Education (FALE) > School of Social Sciences
    Depositing User: Kambati Uriam
    Date Deposited: 25 Feb 2014 13:35
    Last Modified: 20 Jun 2016 15:26
    URI: http://repository.usp.ac.fj/id/eprint/7184
    UNSPECIFIED

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