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The multilingual turn in Sociolinguistics: What use is it to educators?’

Willans, Fiona (2015) The multilingual turn in Sociolinguistics: What use is it to educators?’. UNSPECIFIED.

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    Abstract

    Sociolinguistic research can be considered to have taken a ‘multilingual turn’ (May, 2013) in recent years, challenging and denaturalising the linguistic boundaries that have traditionally been considered to tie languages down into separate, bounded systems. This is partly in response to shifting and multi-layered patterns of movement and communication that have led to far greater linguistic complexity than we were previously accustomed to. However, this is also in recognition of the fact that many of the categories and concepts that we have grown used to using have never adequately captured or reflected the reality that sociolinguists aim to describe (Blommaert & Rampton, 2012). Analytic attention is thus drawn to the way that language users deploy complex repertoires of linguistic resources or features, avoiding the reification of boundaries between the ‘languages’ to which they might traditionally be considered to belong (Jørgensen et al, 2011). The question that then arises is: To what extent can educators make use of this rethinking? What are materials developers, teachers and teacher trainers meant to do with notions such as ‘flexible multilingualism’ and ‘complex repertoires of resources’? This presentation aims to open up these questions for discussion, by talking through some of the sociolinguistic concepts that might be relevant to educators, and considering the extent to which practical benefit can come of recent engagements with linguistic complexity.

    Item Type: Other
    Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
    P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
    P Language and Literature > PL Languages and literatures of Eastern Asia, Africa, Oceania
    Divisions: Faculty of Arts, Law and Education (FALE) > School of Language, Arts and Media
    Depositing User: Fiona Willans
    Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2016 10:47
    Last Modified: 02 Jun 2016 10:47
    URI: http://repository.usp.ac.fj/id/eprint/8869

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